Auto Body 586-751-0190

Frequently Asked Questions

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Frequently Asked Questions

  1. Question 1, How long will the repairs take?
  2. Question 2, Do I have to take my car to the shop my insurance company referred me too?
  3. Question 3, The insurance company said they can only warrant a direct repair facilities(DRP) work and that if I choose a non DRP shop I'm on my own, is this true?
  4. Question 4, What happens if my car is totaled by the insurance company?
  5. Question 5, Who do I pay a deductible to?
  6. Question 6, What are Betterment Charges?
  7. Question 7, Can I wash my car?

Answer 1:

It depends on how much damage your vehicle sustained and the availability of the parts. Your advisor can give you an estimate of the time it will take to complete the repairs to your vehicle. Be sure to check with your advisor for the specifics on your vehicle. A single panel repair depending on what damage it has sustained can be performed in approximately 1 to 2 days after we have the parts.

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Answer 2:

No, not at all, Direct repair referrals are a way for the insurance company to save up to 20% on repairs, Most DRP shops are just discount houses for the insurance companies. You have the legal right to take your vehicle to any shop you desire. The insurance company can only suggest a DRP shop and only if you request they do so.

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Answer 3:

The fact of the matter is the insurance company has to warrant A DRP shops work by law, they don't have a choice. The law was created when insurers were stacking up repairs at DRP shops, telling them how to repair the car and then when things went wrong the insurer placed all the blame on the shop so the government stepped in and created a law that states the insurer has to warrant all DRP work but an insurer will virtually never ever put a penny out of their pocket for shoddy repair work weather it's a DRP shop or not, the repair shop in both cases is 100% responsible for their workmanship. The only way an insurer will pay is if a DRP shop goes out of business. This tactic is just a ploy to get you to their discount house. The Insurance company will pull a DRP agreement from the DRP shop if they don't fix the problem or they will use the State of Michigan's Bureau of Automotive Regulations) procedures to remedy the problem which is the same remedy available to you if there is ever a problem concerning any State licensed repair facility. The best thing you can do is call the Bureau of Automotive Regulation or go online and check for any complaints filed with a particular shop. If the shop you choose has a good record with the State BAR, has been in business for a long period of time and has liability insurance and is licensed you should feel confident about taking your vehicle there for repairs.

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Answer 4:

The insurance company will notify you if the repairs exceed 70% of the value of the vehicle which is the formula most insurers use when figuring out if the vehicle is totaled or not, this percentage is not set in stone and can be negotiated and there is no law that says they have to total it at all if the repair costs are less than 100% to value. At that point the insurer will give you a purchase price for your vehicle which is a retail replacement cost for a vehicle of your type with the same type of mileage and options. This purchase price is negotiable, be diligent and get any evidence such as online price guides (NADA), (Kelly Blue Book) or online ads and dealer pricing to use when negotiating your settlement. Federal law states that the insurance company has to provide you with a used car guide retail price that is authorized by the State Bureau of Insurance regulations or quotes from dealers for that exact model within 4000 miles. don't forget any receipts you have for any repair work you had done recently or upgrades you performed to he vehicle this all helps when negotiating. You also have the right to retain ownership of the car for an amount that the insurer can sell the vehicle for to a salvage yard. The insurer has to provide you with 3 quotes from these salvage yards to confirm the salvage price. I suggest getting it in writing from these salvage yards. Your deductible will apply to the negotiated price.

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Answer 5:

The amount of deductible that you will be responsible for is determined by your insurance policy. If you have broad collision and the accident was not your fault (less than 50%)or the car was parked when the accident occurred, your deductible will be waived by your insurance company. With standard collision you are responsible for your deductible whether it's your fault or not. Also the State of Michigan has a mini tort statute that allows persons who are not at fault to recover up to $1000.00 from the other party or other parties insurer.

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Answer 6:

Parts that wear out and need replacement with time and use (i.e., tires, batteries, and suspension parts) are commonly subject to betterment charges when they are replaced during the repair process. These betterment charges are determined by your insurance company and are pro-rated based on actual miles on your vehicle.

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Answer 7:

RECOMMENDATIONS AND PRECAUTIONS IN THE FIRST 30 DAYS DO Wash the vehicle by hand with cool water and a very mild car wash solution using a soft cloth or sponge. Always use clean fresh water. Wash your vehicle in the shade DON'T Do not use a commercial car wash. Stiff brushes or sponges could mar the finish and damage the surface. Do not "dry wipe" your vehicle. Dry wiping can scratch the finish. Do not drive on gravel roads. Chipping the finish is easily done in the first 30 days. • Avoid parking under trees and utility lines which are likely to attract birds. Bird droppings have a high acid content and will damage a freshly painted surface. Also, tree sap can mar or spot a freshly painted surface. Do not spill gasoline, oil, antifreeze, transmission fluid, or windshield solvent on the new finish. Do not scrape ice or snow from the newly painted surface. RECOMMENDATIONS AND PRECAUTIONS IN THE FIRST 90 DAYS DON'T Do not wax or polish the vehicle. This will allow the finish to dry and harden completely. You may wax after 90 days.

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